The things z likes

The girl from Porlock

Nov 3

explore-blog:

Prologue – teas inspired by literary classics. To be brewed according to George Orwell’s 11 golden rules for the perfect cup of tea and sipped alongside snacks from The Artists’ and Writers’ Cookbook.


squidswilbesquids:

Egon Schiele - Mother and Child ( Madonna ) 

squidswilbesquids:

Egon Schiele - Mother and Child ( Madonna ) 

(via tierradentro)


silvabism:

Memory of Ivancice
by Alphonse Mucha 

silvabism:

Memory of Ivancice

by Alphonse Mucha 

(via tierradentro)



Nov 2
laurark:

Moby Dick.

laurark:

Moby Dick.


theparisreview:

This would either confuse an alien who had just set foot on Earth, or maybe explain everything: the NSA haiku generator.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

This would either confuse an alien who had just set foot on Earth, or maybe explain everything: the NSA haiku generator.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

(via robcam-wfu)


“The writing of our day has freed itself from the necessity of “expression”; it only refers to itself, yet it is not restricted to the confines of interiority. On the contrary, we recognize it in its exterior deployment. This reversal transforms writing into an interplay of signs, regulated less by the content it signifies than by the very nature of the signifier. Moreover, it implies an action that is always testing the limits of its regularity, transgressing and reversing an order that it accepts and manipulates. Writing unfolds like a game that inevitably moves beyond its own rules and finaIIy leaves them behind. Thus, the essential basis of this writing is not the exalted emotions related to the act of composition or the insertion of a subject into language. Rather, it is primarily concerned with creating an opening where the writing subject endlessly disappears.” Foucault, “What is an author?”

Oct 29
tierradentro:

“Boy with a Crow”, 1884, Akseli Gallen-Kallela.

tierradentro:

Boy with a Crow”, 1884, Akseli Gallen-Kallela.


smithsonianlibraries:

From our favorite German book of book arts Die entwicklung der modernen buchkunst in Deutschland a collection of creepy designs for various novels.

Knut Hamsun’s novel Sult (Hunger) has nothing to do with Halloween, wolves, or anything scary, but isn’t that orange and black design for a German edition great? And what is up with that spider/octopus thing?


Oct 27
thedoctorloves221b:


“Lord of the flies”

How did you even

thedoctorloves221b:

“Lord of the flies”

How did you even

(via aimforfairytales)


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